WSJ Salutes The Trash Fish Of New England

Monday’s Wall Street Journal A-Hed:

OB-YA585_TRASHF_D_20130630220908Short of Cod, Massachusetts Chefs Suggest a Dish of Blood Cockle

Catch Limits Have New Englanders Testing New Recipes, and Names, for ‘Trash Fish’

BOSTON—Scott Segal considers himself an adventurous eater committed to seafood from local sources. But even he got a little squeamish about the Cape Cod Blood Cockle on his plate at Area Four, a Cambridge, Mass., restaurant.

A local clam that is typically banished from New England menus because, true to its name, it is filled with blood-red goop, the cockle was coated with a spicy rub and served as part of a “Trash Fish” dinner hosted earlier this year by Boston chefs.

The event is one of many ways the local culinary community is promoting cooking with so-called underutilized species because of deep cuts in catch limits that took effect May 1 in New England for fish including haddock, flounder and, most painfully, cod, the official state fish of Massachusetts.

“Oh God, they’ve got to rename these things so they sound more attractive,” says Dr. Segal, the chairman of the department of anesthesiology at Tufts University School of Medicine, and a guest at the dinner.

As the Journal reports, “[t]o get themselves off the hook, Massachusetts chefs and fishing communities are also looking to dogfish, tautog and sea robin [shown above].”

Best of all:

P1-BM132_TRASHF_G_20130630184338[The Chefs Collaborative] that held the “trash fish” dinner, even [used] miniature trash cans to hold the Atlantic Pollock, which was blended with piquillo pepper and Spanish chorizo.

 

Bon chorizo!

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2 Responses to WSJ Salutes The Trash Fish Of New England

  1. The kind of people who’ll eat out of a toy trashcan will eat any kind of fish anyway.

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