Hulubaloo Over Political Ads

One trend that’s emerging during this election cycle is the rise in web video ads and the delay in traditional TV advertising. That’s been most apparent in the GOP presidential primaries, where only Ron Paul (R-89 Seconds) has run extensive TV campaigns, while Rick Perry (R-Back for Seconds) just getting a head of steam up and Mitt Romney (R-I Can’t Talk Right Now) has yet to run a single spot.

Then there’s this report from Ad Age:

Hulu Makes Play for 2012 Political Dollars as TV Ad Prices Heat Up

With ZIP-Code-Level Targeting, Video Site Appeals to Candidates in Multiple-District Media Markets

TV continues to be the sledgehammer of political campaigns, with even the most digital-oriented candidates, like Scott Brown, who ran for a Senate seat in Massachusetts in 2010, only spending about 10% of their media budgets online. But that percentage is expected to inch upward in the 2012 election cycle, and sites like Hulu stand to benefit as media buyers look to buy political spots in competitive districts in expensive media markets.

The Ad Age report says Hulu wasn’t really ready for the 2010 elections, but they are now.   Ads on Hulu are more expensive than on YouTube, but Hulu delivers more:

[M]any political consultants are intrigued by the prospect of Hulu’s highly attentive audience coupled with ZIP-code targeting capability — which could come in handy in gerrymandered districts that fall into multiple TV broadcast zones, where congressional candidates are accustomed to making buys to reach a relatively small segment of local voters.

Other site to keep an eye on: MLB.com and ESPN3.com.

Digital campaign ads will never come close to replacing traditional TV spots, but Hulu hopes they can at least make a dent.

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1 Response to Hulubaloo Over Political Ads

  1. Pingback: Opening Pandora’s (Political) Box | Campaign Outsider

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