Why The Wall Street Journal Is Still A Great Newspaper (Buddy Holly’s Glasses Edition)

Rupert Murdoch, Rupert Shmurdoch.

Despite all the handwringing when the Prints of Darkness added the Wall Street Journal to his newspaper empire four years ago, the paper has not gone to hell in a handbasket.

Some even say it’s better.

Whichever, the Journal’s A-Heds still set the standard for offbeat newsgathering, as Monday’s edition demonstrates for the umpteenth time:

Framing a Young Rocker: The Man Who Picked Glasses for Buddy Holly

Lubbock Optometrist, Inspired by Style of Sgt. Bilko, Bought the First Pair in Mexico

Nut graf:

[Buddy] Holly’s songs shaped rock ‘n’ roll, influencing many of the major groups of the 1960s. But his black-framed glasses created a nerd-gone-cool image that ultimately became almost as influential as his music.

Pop-culture experts often point to those black frames as rock’s first great fashion statement, one that set the stage for countless others. Without Buddy Holly’s glasses, they say, the world would likely never have seen John Lennon in his granny-style glasses nor Elton John in his oversize frames. For that matter, it might never have seen Madonna in her cone-shaped bra or Lady Gaga in her meat dress . . .

A reach, you say?

Maybe, baby.

Even so, a smart read.

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2 Responses to Why The Wall Street Journal Is Still A Great Newspaper (Buddy Holly’s Glasses Edition)

  1. Mr Punch says:

    Well, sure, Holly’s glasses. But it was Gene Vincent who developed the style that stood the test of time.

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