What We Need Is A “Do Not Trick” Law

NPR’s All Things Considered ran a piece yesterday about negotiations among U.S. technology companies to protect consumer privacy on the Internet, with a special eye toward European standards:

America’s big technology companies are negotiating the details of a new privacy system called “Do Not Track,” to let people shield their personal data on websites. There’s no deal yet, but people inside the talks say the main reason American companies are even considering “Do Not Track” is the pressure they’re feeling from Europe . . .

Not only should people be allowed to block websites from collecting and keeping their data, [a European privacy regulator] says, but that should be the default setting — on European browsers, at least.

Tell that to the U.S. House of Representatives, which just passed proposed legislation (code name CISPA) that “would increase the information that is shared between government and technology companies, giving each protection to share confidential information with one another in the interest of warding off cyberthreats.”

Can you say “working at cross-purposes”?

I knew you could.

 

Originally posted on the Newer! Improveder! Sneak ADtack!

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2 Responses to What We Need Is A “Do Not Trick” Law

  1. Michael Pahre says:

    What planet are you on? Or are you channeling Eric Fernstrom?

    Because of all these 3rd-party ad-trackers I use the Firefox plugin Abine Privacy Suite. Which is why I know that your blog’s website is currently running no fewer than eight web trackers:

    Social networks:
    Google+
    Twitter

    Ad network:
    Quantcast

    Company trackers:
    Google AdSense
    Google Analytics
    Quantcast [two from the same company!]
    Comscore Beacon
    Wordpress Stats

    Turn off your trackers!

    • Campaign Outsider says:

      As J.J. Hunsecker said in “Sweet Smell of Success,” I’m a schoolboy, Mike – teach me, teach me.

      How do I get rid of the 3rd-party ad-trackers I never knew were there?

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